Show Details for the week of September 9th, 2013

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The Monitor this week looks at the supposed legality of the pending military action against Syria and the Exxon Mobil’s negative 25 out of 100 possible points the annual Corporate Equality Index. Our guests are Marjorie Cohn and Antonia Juhasz.

More about this week’s guests:

Marjorie Cohn

Marjorie Cohn is past president of the National Lawyers Guild. She lectures throughout the world on international human rights and U.S. foreign policy. A news consultant for CBS News, and a legal analyst for Court TV, she also provides legal and political commentary on BBC, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, NPR, Air America and Pacifica Radio. Professor Cohn is the author of  The United States and Torture ,  Rules of Disengagement,  Cowboy Republicand co-author of Cameras in the Courtroom: Television and the Pursuit of Justice. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals such as Fordham Law Review, Hastings Law Journal and Virginia Journal of International Law, as well as The National Law Journal, Christian Science Monitor and Chicago Tribune. She is now working on a book on the topic of Drones. We will have her back on the show when she completes the book.

Marjorie joins The Monitor this week to talk about Killing Civilians to Protect Civilians in which she says, in part, that President Barack Obama admitted, “If the U.S. goes in and attacks another country without a UN mandate and without clear evidence that can be presented, then there are questions in terms of whether international law supports it . . .” The Obama administration is studying the 1999 “NATO air war in Kosovo as a possible blueprint for acting without a mandate from the United Nations,” the New York Times reported. But NATO’s Kosovo bombing also violated the UN Charter as the Security Council never approved it, and it was not carried out in self-defense. The UN Charter does not permit the use of military force for “humanitarian interventions.” Humanitarian concerns do not constitute self-defense. In fact, humanitarian concerns should spur the international community to seek peace and end the suffering, not increase military attacks, which could endanger peace in the entire region.

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Antonia Juhasz

Antonia Juhasz is a leading oil and energy expert. She is a Fellow of the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Juhasz is the author of three books: Black Tide: the Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill (2011), The Tyranny of Oil (2008), and The Bush Agenda (2006). Her writing has also appeared in numerous publications, most recently in Rolling Stone.com (Big Oil’s Big Lies About Alternatives), The Atlantic (“The New War for Afghanistan’s Untapped Oil”), Harper’s Magazine (“Light, Sweet, Crude”), and CNN.com (“Why the Iraq War was Fought for Big Oil”), and, among others, in the New York TimesWashington Post, Los Angeles TimesPetroleum Review MagazineThe Nation andThe Progressive.

Juhasz is a frequent media commentator, appearing regularly on TV and radio, including on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, The Diane Rehm Show, and Democracy Now! with Amy Goodman, among many others.

Juhasz is a reporter with the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute, an associate fellow with the Institute for Policy Studies, and a senior policy analyst for Foreign Policy In Focus. She is on the National Advisory Committee of Iraq Veterans Against the War and on the Board of Directors of Coffee Strong. Juhasz founded the Energy Program at Global Exchangeand directed it from 2009 to 2011. She previously worked at the International Forum on Globalization and served as a Legislative Assistant to two US Members of Congress. Juhasz holds a Masters Degree in Public Policy from Georgetown University and a Bachelors Degree in Public Policy from Brown University.

She joins The Monitor this week to talk about her recent article  What’s Wrong With Exxon?

Antonia can also be followed on Twitter: Twitter.com/AntoniaJuhasz

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